Human Resource Management, Management and Leadership, Organization and Management

The Pareto’s or 80/20 Management Rule

Get “the 80/20 rule” right! The critical task of an effective manager is to plan and to delegate as work circumstances may require. Know who should be delegated for what and when. The nature and the timing of the delegated assignments, the knowledge, the skills, the abilities, work habits, personal and professional values and philosophy of the employees should be taken into considerations in the decision-making process. The 80/20 rule is universe but how you apply does matter. Apply it wisely.

In the Federal government, managers may exercise the “perform other duties as assigned” to delegate the 20% of the tasks that are of low value so managers can focus on the 80% of the tasks that are critical to the success of a project, a one-time or infrequent assignments. Delegating does not mean you permanently assign your employees to do your job for you. You receive compensation and awards and they don’t. Each employee has the required critical duties and responsibilities that are required of them to perform and be measured against for success or failure. The delegated tasks must belong to the “perform other duties as assigned” category and must be temporary. In a team work environment, each employee will receive a delegated portion by assignment or by volunteering. I find it a little bit easy to allow each employee to select what delegated tasks they want to help out and can work independently with great results while meeting deadlines and performance expectations. As managers, you should be able to engage and to encourage all employees to participate and you should recognize and reward them timely, fairly and equitably. Apply the principles of equal opportunity, equal employment opportunity and inclusion and you will see amazing results. Managers must plan well and must be fair to all for the 80/20 rule to work.

When the employees are assigned the 80% critical tasks on a continual basis, compensation and rewards must be considered and the job description must be updated for ensuring full accountability. In this scenario, the existing 80/20 or the Pareto’s rule does not apply.

What are your thoughts on the 80/20 rule? Have you used it? Does it work for you? I would like to hear from you!

Phuong Le Callaway, Ph.D. (Organization & Management/Human Resource Management)

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Human Resource Management, Management and Leadership, Organization and Management, Organizational Culture

Telework Works!

I have been commuting to work by air since January 2012, from the West to the East on a monthly basis, more days at the work site and a few days at home. I know some folks travel more often than I do as part of their jobs! In fact, I am helping the US economy and investors by commuting to work by air for the last 3 years!

Thanks to the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010. This Act has helped in the recruitment of the right talent, I hope, and retention of high performers and in improving productivity as employees can telework despite national crisis and hazardous weather conditions! Managers need more help to make the telework workforce more realistic for both the organizations and telework-eligible and telework-ready employees free of personal biases and irrelevant considerations.

Performance results matter no matter where they work! Let’s employees choose where they want to work within the organizational work structure and ethical framework to produce expected performance outcomes and results. Hold employees accountable for expected performance. Managers have the upper hand to discipline misconduct behaviors or to fire non-performers. Of course, managers need to perform their jobs as managers as managing tasks and leading people.

It is not the location of work but employee performance. Are they working as expected? Are they producing as expected? Do they know what they are expected to perform and under what standards of performance?

Leaders need to support managers who are afraid to fail in the new workforce and digital structure. Everyone needs to be on board to make it work. Employees should know if they are telework-ready or not as they don’t want to fail.

Telework works and is a huge savings for the organizations and enhances employee satisfaction. It can be a great motivation tool. Telework is not an entitlement but a tool to motivate performance for those who need it and to maintain high level of productivity. This is a great management tool. The telework structure will be effective when organizations move toward self-managed work teams with the right self-managed work team policy and work systems.

My motto, “work without physical boundaries and produce or out of job. Employees’ choice.”

What are your thoughts on teleworking for those who have a need to keep work and personal in balance while focusing on the organizational’s mission and achieving performance outcomes and results?

Phuong Le Callaway, Ph.D. (Organization & Management/Human Resource Management)

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Human Resource Management, Management and Leadership, Organization and Management

The Pareto or The 80/20 Management Rule

Get the “80/20” rule right! The critical task of an effective manager is to plan and to delegate as work circumstances may require. Know who should be delegated for what and when. The nature and the timing of the delegated assignments, the knowledge, the skills, the abilities, work habits, personal and professional values and philosophy of the employees should be taken into considerations in the decision-making process. The 80/20 rule is universe but how you apply does matter. Apply it wisely.

In the Federal government, managers may exercise the “perform other duties as assigned” to delegate the 20% of the tasks that are of low value so managers can focus on the 80% of the tasks that are critical to the success of a project, a one-time or infrequent assignments. Delegating does not mean you permanently assign your employees to do your job for you. You receive compensation and awards and they don’t. Each employee has the required critical duties and responsibilities that are required of them to perform and be measured against for success or failure. The delegated tasks must belong to the “perform other duties as assigned” category and must be temporary. In a team work environment, each employee will receive a delegated portion by assignment or by volunteering. I find it a little bit easy to allow each employee to select what delegated tasks they want to help out and can work independently with great results while meeting deadlines and performance expectations. As managers, you should be able to engage and to encourage all employees to participate and you should recognize and reward them timely, fairly and equitably. Apply the principles of equal opportunity, equal employment opportunity and inclusion and you will see amazing results. Managers must plan well and must be fair to all for the 80/20 rule to work.

When the employees are assigned the 80% critical tasks on a continual basis, compensation and rewards must be considered and the job description must be updated for ensuring full accountability. In this scenario, the existing 80/20 or the Pareto’s rule does not apply. What are your thoughts on my 80/20 rule? Have you used it? Does it work for you? I am interested in how you use this rule.

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New Organizational Cultural Framework

The cultural principles by which organizational leaders have led and managed their operations for at least the past century no longer seems practical and relevant in today’s fast changing environment.  The organization as a whole must create a shared cultural framework that will be transparent and powerful enough to support telework and mobil work environment and to replace hierarchy.

That framework must not merely be a program or technique or a sophisticated new way to manipulate the future but must be based on fundamental principles, enhance the stability and transparency of workplace relationships, help define the new covenant, and enable managers to use common sense in making organizational and business decisions.

The new culture starts with the belief that a high level of motivation is most likely to come when all employees own their workplace culture and when their objectives  and career goals are aligned with the organization’s strategic directions.

This new culture must have the following 8 core values:

1) respect for employees,

2) integrity and honesty,

3) ownership, belongings and alignment,

4) consensus on workplace principles

5) trust-based relationships,

6) full responsibility and accountability,

7) results-based performance; and,

8) recognition and growth.

Respect, trust, transparency, honesty and integrity, results-based, and growth are the most important ingredients.  The new cultural framework must include the following 5 characteristics:

1) all operating agreements should be based on principles,

2) the process must be transparent, and not be done in secrecy,

3) everyone, teams, groups and the entire organization must engage in a significant shift in behavior,

4) behavioral and communication rules should be established to govern how individuals, teams of individuals, groups or organization will work together in normal situations and in emergencies or crisis.

5) rewarding creativity and innovation, and ethical, value-based behavior and results-based performance.

These characteristics will enable an organization to survive and prosper in the future and they constitute a profile of an innovative organization.  What are your ingredients and characteristics of a desirable, new cultural framework in this advanced technology and the new economy?  What are your requirements for an innovative organization?  I appreciate your thoughts on how we can develop an effective shared culture in which every employee owns and wants to be part of the organization?

By Dr. Phuong Le Callaway, (PhD) in Organization and Management/Human Resource Management

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Management and Leadership, Organization and Management, Organizational Culture

Cultural Perspectives

Every organization has a culture.  Whether weak or strong, culture has a powerful influence throughout an organization and affects practically everything, from who gets promoted and what decisions are made, to how employees dress and what sports they play. Because of this impact, culture has a major effect on the success of the organization. Organizational cultures are the very essence of organizations.  Whether effective or ineffective, organizational cultures exist and are determined in various ways by all employees and reflected through the personality of the top leader.

Culture is defined as “the way we do things around here.” It is the shared ways in which groups of employees understand and interpret the world through organizational goals, policies, products, or services.  Culture comes in layers, like an onion.  To understand it, one has to peel it layer by layer.  The products  and services are on the outer layer.  The layers of values and norms are deeper within the onion and are more difficult to identify.  The way in which attitudes are expressed in a specific organization is described as organizational culture.

Organization differentiates from each other through a basic set of values, underlying beliefs and assumptions.  There are 4 basic types of organizational cultures:

1) the tough guy culture maintains a high level of risks and stress,

2) the work hard, play hard culture maintains a high level of relatively low risk activity and emphasizes team work, meetings, contests, and high volume output,

3) the bet-your-company culture requires its members to make decisions for high impact and does not tolerate risk-taking and immaturity, and,

4) the process culture is a bureaucratic organization whose employees focus not on what is done, but on how things are done.

What organizational culture do you belong?  Are your values, underlying beliefs and assumptions in alignment with your organizational culture?

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The Five Elements of Trust

Five (5) basic principles:
1) focus on the issue, behavior, or problem, not on the person.
2) maintain the self-confidence and self-esteem of others.
3) maintain constructive relationships.
4) take initiative to make things better.
5) lead by example.

These principles can help build a foundation of trust with your team. What are your thoughts of building a foundation of trust with your team?

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